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[car_overhaul] Roadspeed Revival


206 replies to this topic

#41
Alastairh

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Nice work Mince.

I still can't get over that your going to remove a working 8 valve for another, considering how many spare 16v lumps you've bought and then sold!

Al

#42
allye

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Such a great read, quite refreshing to read a project that is quite simple but covered in great detail! And as you'd expect the attention to detail is faultless!

Also I really like project threads that get updated very often (unlike mine thats coming along nice and slowly!)

Ali

#43
hman205

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Not tempted to Paint the Dampers before putting them on then?

Looking good mate give me a shout if you want it given a buzz over with the polisher and given some protection

#44
pug_ham

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Looking good & nice progress being made Anthony, even a small garage like you have is much better than no garage & having to work around mother nature.

Interesting to see the markings on the inserts for the SBC shocks, I got some shocks off Darren Halliwell earlier this year that are the same style of inverted damper but the inserts have no markings on them to compare. :(

I stripped a GTI-6 bottom end last week & the crank pinion for the oil pump is even bigger than the XU10 one I've fitted to my new engine so that would definately need the web I had trimmed removing so you could fit it.

Hmm, good condition white non sunroof GTI with a sorted 8v motor & quailty suspension, this is slowly turning into my ideal spec road 205 GTI. :unsure:

Graham.

#45
lemmingzappa

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:(

#46
Andy_C

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Cleared garage, painted beam - you're turning into a polish-nerd Mr Shuttle.

Seriously. nice project this and glad the bits you held onto are being put to excellent use. The donor's still giving me enough smiles per gallon to not worry about the manky roof whatsoever but if you want yours tarted up give me a shout whenever :unsure:

I'll also sort out those stickers - haven't forgotten and they're not as yet covered in 29 coats of wax....

Edited by Andy_C, 11 November 2010 - 03:29 PM.


#47
Anthony

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I still can't get over that your going to remove a working 8 valve for another, considering how many spare 16v lumps you've bought and then sold!

I've still got a few on the backburner should I decide to go down the 16v route in the future, with a choice of a 1.9 Mi16, XU7 hybrid, and a 2.0 S16. For now though, a humble 8v is quick enough to entertain and suits the rest of the package nicely.

Not tempted to Paint the Dampers before putting them on then?

Looking good mate give me a shout if you want it given a buzz over with the polisher and given some protection

I did consider it, but decided that given how exposed they are, any paint would quickly be chipped off and look tatty - you'd really need powdercoat to keep it looking good, and that would mean completely stripping down the dampers. If and when I get the inserts serviced/rebuilt, I'll look into getting it done then.

I'll likely take you up on the offer to give the paintwork a once over with the buffer as and when it's ready to go back on the road, and the paintwork is looking distinctly on the flat side. I'll give you a shout nearer the time B)

Looking good & nice progress being made Anthony, even a small garage like you have is much better than no garage & having to work around mother nature.

Granted, it is indeed better than no garage at all - whilst it's too small to work on the car in, it does mean that I can work on parts off the car away from the elements, and store the car in there even if I'm part way through a job without having to worry about putting it back together and watertight/secure.

Cleared garage, painted beam - you're turning into a polish-nerd Mr Shuttle.

I'll also sort out those stickers - haven't forgotten and they're not as yet covered in 29 coats of wax....

Steady on now Andy - I'm still far more interested in driving than polishing, fear not! Also, the difference is that I don't paint over all the nuts and bolts... unlike a certain other person :ph34r:

I'm in no desperate rush for the two Roadspeed stickers as clearly the car is a fair way from finished still, but as and when you can remove them from the Sorrento I'll have them back off you and fit them to the car as a symbolic finishing touch

#48
Anthony

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Not a huge amount of progress today, but did get the heater matrix swapped out.

The old heater matrix had done fine service, but had started weeping earlier in the year after I flushed the cooling system through, removing sediment that had probably been sealing the matrix. It wasn't losing much coolant, maybe a litre every 2-3000 miles or so, but even the smallest leak needs rectifying before it gets worse or causes further problems, such as ruining the headunit.

Picked up a replacement heater matrix from Euro Car Parts - part number 214735000 - for 15.28 including VAT. This comes with everything needed, including the pipes and seals.

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Removing the old heater matrix was straight forward, as I had already removed some of the trim when installing the wiring loom for the electric windows and central locking. Removing the remaining parts, disconnecting the two coolant hoses inside the engine bay, and the old heater matrix was removed. It's held in the heater box with just a couple of screws, and the pipes secured to the matrix with four screws in total.

The old matrix was in much better condition that I was expecting considering it was 21 years old, although there was signs of leakage, confirming my suspicion that it needed replacing. The original pipes were in surprisingly poor condition though, notably corroded probably due to insufficient anti-freeze at some period in the cars life.

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Comparing the new and old matrix showed a significant different in the density of fins, with the original (Valeo?) unit having considerably more fins than the new, pattern item. Logically, this will have a knock-on effect on the heat output, as more fins should mean that more heat it transfered from the coolant into the air - difficult to tell, as certainly when I started the car and let it warm up, the heater seemed to blow sufficiently warm, not obviously different to the original (likely partly blocked/clogged) matrix.

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Ran out of light again after topping up and re-bleeding the cooling system, but fingers crossed there doesn't appear to be any leaks that I can see so I can atleast put the interior back together tomorrow (weather permitting).

#49
Anthony

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Before I make a start on todays work, I dug out the rear dampers to see what they are after discovering that the front inserts were softer than I was expecting.

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The rears have a couple of part numbers on them - 4501BE5-61000T9 stamped on the body, and the similar K4-BE5-61000T9 printed on the sticker. Hand writen on the dampers is 360/250, which judging from this post suggests that they're PTS Group N 205 Forest spec - again, like the front inserts, a little softer than I was expecting, but clearly effective.

#50
Anthony

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After replacing the heater matrix yesterday, I decided that it would be a good time to pull the carpet up and check whether there was any moisture trapped below. The carpet itself felt dry with the exception of the drivers footwell which was very slightly damp, so I wasn't expecting anything too notable.

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Seemingly I was very wrong, the extent of which was clear when I lifted up the carpet to see that there was significant damp evident in both front footwells and, bizarrely, most significantly in the rear drivers side footwell. It's not uncommon for rear quarter windows to leak and pool water in the rear footwell, but the rear carpet had always felt dry and there had never been any evidence of a leak, so the amount of water under there was surprising. I'm beginning to think that my choice of using carpet underlay when I last had the carpet out wasn't my best choice, as it was sponge based - and we all know how well sponge holds water...

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Pulling the underlay up showed what initially appeared to be an ugly scene, but thankfully, what initially appeared to be extensive surface rust was thankfully just where the colour had bleed from the saturated underlay. Lesson learnt not to use carpet underlay in future! Still, after a quick clean up it looked far better

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There was some fresh surface rust particularly in the drivers side rear footwell where it had been sat in water for what, I'm guessing, was a significant amount of time. Better news was that the surface rust treatment that I'd done last time I had the carpet out was all looking good and hadn't worsened at all, despite the damp underlay.

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Checking over the rest of the shell, I found a small crack starting to form in the usual place near the handbrake, although it was less than a couple of centimetres long. I terminated both ends of the crack with a small drill hole, and I'll get it welded up when I do the other issues I found.

Other issues I hear you cry? Well, yes, unfortunately. There has been some notable rust under the rear seats in the usual place that I'd been meaning to do something with for a while, but kept putting off the same as I had been with the central locking and electric window install. Unfortunately, rust has a habit of not aging very well, and a bit of poking and attacking it with a wire wheel left me with speed holes under the rear seat :(

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There's a couple of spots in the boot that look like they might need to be cut out and fresh metal welded in, although it still subjectively seems fairly solid. Both the two spots in the boot and under the rear seats are common rust areas that I reckon many people are ignoring until it's too late - the problem being that the rust comes up from underneath, so by the time you see it bubbling through, it's already pretty bad.

The age old "205's don't rust" arguement these days is getting increasingly dubious - whilst I freely admit that my car has had a comparitively hard life, it was made in the "golden age" of 205's when rust protection was at its best, and I suspect that there's alot of cars out there that are hiding some significant rust - nothing like your typical Ford or Vauxhall from the same era suffers from mind you. Rear quarters, rear bumper mounts, front wing seams, headlight panels - all rust prone areas that really do need checking.

Still, those areas can wait for now, as I need to get hold of a welder before I can sort them out - and someone to teach me how weld would probably be helpful too :) For now, I just cracked on with what I could do, namely sorting out the light surface rust on the floor plan. Kurust is what I've used before - grind off the worse off the rust, apply the Kurust and it reacts with the rust, neutralising it.

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The Kurust reacts with the rust and turns a dark purple colour - the lighter purple is just where I've applied it around the affected areas to ensure that nothing has been missed. What I will do this time that I didn't do last time is give it a quick coat of paint once it's cured to give it further protection from damp - that's tomorrows job, assuming it manages to dry properly overnight given that the car is parked on the driveway and it's freezing out there.

#51
Anthony

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With the Kurust drying overnight, I took the opportunity to give the carpet a clean to bring it back up to a nice bright red. Unfortuntately, the small issue of it being winter means that cleaning the carpet outside wasn't an option, so instead I did what any self-respecting batchelor would do - crack open a beer, hang the carpet above the bath and use the shower to clean it.

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Despite the carpet not looking particularly dirty when it was in the car, the amount of grime that came out of it was immense - the water coming off it was brown initially, which was pretty disgusting. slowly but surely though, the water ran clean and the carpet looked much better - I'll get a picture tomorrow when it's finished drying off.

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With the carpet now clean, I decided that the seats could do with a little TLC as the leather was starting to dry up and no longer looking its best. Gliptone leather cleaner and conditioner does a fantastic job though, following a clean and couple of applications of conditioner, the rear seats were already looking and feeling better. I'll give them another application of conditioner before I refit them into the car though, just for good measure.

Front seats to follow in the next few days when I get chance

#52
hman205

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All looking good mate can't wait for you to have it back out to play. just need to find me one now thats cheap enough that Vikki won't complain about me spending the wedding budget on lol.

#53
Gibbo GTI

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I feel your pain on the rust under the rar seat. Mine had gone in similar places as well as a few others. The Rally prep shell i've just picked up is a '92 shell like my car but it has no rust there or has any signs of being repaired there in the past.

Loving the carpet cleaning lol. I cleaned my mountain bike in the bath/shower last week as I live in a 3rd floor flat, didn't have a beer in my hand so will have to work on that lol.

#54
Simes

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I like this thread.
It reminds me to get off my arse and finish mine off.

#55
S33GAV

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Nice thread. I remember the amount of dirt that came off my carpet when I used the vax to clean it, it was minging!

A bit gutting to see that rust though :lol:

#56
Alan_M

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Mine's getting this over winter too, inside and underneath. Had a mooch under the car the other day and noticed one of the rubber bungs has fallen out, allowing rust to form between the double skinned floor. Whole things getting done now!

If I'm not using it, you're quite welcome to borrow my welder for the little jobs.

Steamers work well on the carpets, used mine to good effect previously with some Vanish. Otherwise, coming together well :lol:

#57
Anthony

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Taking advantage of a dry (but cold) day I cracked on with getting the interior back together.

First job was to give the areas that I treated with Kurust yesterday a coat of paint to protect them further. I had planned to paint it all properly in Alpine White to match the existing paint, but the cold weather quickly scraped that idea as the rattle cans just wouldn't spray properly and then blocked themselves up.

Deciding that it didn't matter too much whether it was a good colour match - seeing as it will be hidden underneath a carpet - I opted for plan B and used brush-on Hammerite instead, which worked fine even on cold metal. What it does highlight is just how creamy Alpine White is - it's not immediately obvious when looking at the car in isolation, but put a crisp, bright white next to it and it's very noticeable.

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While that was drying, I decided to tackle another job that had been on the "I must get around to that" list for far too long and sort out the alarm install. I'd "installed" it (and I use that term loosely!) the morning before flying over to Cyprus for a friends wedding back in August 2008 after it transpired that I was going to have to drive a group down to the airport and leave my car parked up for a week in the long stay parking - and there was no way that I was happy doing that in a 205 with no alarm/immobiliser whatsoever.

It worked, but it was a bit of a lash-up with messy wiring and the module hanging loose behind the dash, although still better than most "professional" alarm installations that I've had the misfortune of having to fix/remove over the years. No pictures or specific details for obvious reasons, but suffice to say that it's installed properly now and any would-be thief will atleast have to work for their prize if they want to drive it away.

I even mounted the LED properly finally, instead of hanging loose out of the front of the air vent in true bodgetastic style as it had been. That's the problem with bodges and why I don't like doing them - they inevitably end up being far more long-term than you intended.

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With the alarm now sorted and the paint dry, I fitted the carpet back in that I cleaned last night, and a very good job I did too if I do say so myself! All the oily and grimey marks have gone, and it's now a uniform bright red colour like the day it left the factory.

Until I'm 100% sure that there's no more leaks I've not put any underlay back in, and in truth I'm in two minds about bothering to refit it even if it is leak free - having been in 205's with the underlay removed they're not noticeably louder, and makes it a few kilos lighter. We'll see - first I need to convince myself that it's definitely watertight after how wet the underlay was previously.

#58
Anthony

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All looking good mate can't wait for you to have it back out to play. just need to find me one now thats cheap enough that Vikki won't complain about me spending the wedding budget on lol.

You just need to sell the idea to her better - point out that it's an investment and that values are appreciating, point out the cheap running costs, and, well, hope she's forgotten about the problems you had with the last one B)

If I'm not using it, you're quite welcome to borrow my welder for the little jobs.

Thanks, much appreciated ;)

#59
feb

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The weather has not dampened your spirit Anthony.
Well done and keep up the good work, your dedication is admirable.
After seeing the soggy underlay of my sorrento when it had the leak I wouldn't fit it as you never know when a new leak will occur.
Saying that, if there is a leak the water will never(?) dry IMHO even without the underlay since the carpet is waterproof isn't it?

#60
pug_ham

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Looking good.

What it does highlight is just how creamy Alpine White is - it's not immediately obvious when looking at the car in isolation, but put a crisp, bright white next to it and it's very noticeable.

I agree, I've a J reg shell outside I'm slowly working on & when I did the engine bay last year the difference between the later Bianca white & hammerite is still quite shocking.

Moving on at a good pace Anthony, you'll probably have this almost done before I get my engine back in at this rate.:P

Graham.



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